Houseplant trends

1. Big Bold Leaves
Here at Flowerland we find that plants that feature large, wide, and dramatic leaves are popular. “Big-leafed” plants, such as Monstera, Fiddle Leaf Fig, Philodendrons, Alocasia as examples provide instant impact to a space. “They create a foliar and tropical feel from the moment you set them in place. So think big leaves for 2022!

Jennifer poses with the big showy foliage of Whale Fin Sanseveria
The big bold leaves of Fiddle Leaf Fig

2. Hole-y Leaves
Species of plants that show off big splits holes and slits is called fenestration. Plants like Monstera Philodendron or Rhaphidophora tetrasperma and “Swiss Cheese”are visually impactful and add lots of interest! Shangri La Philodendron and Lickety Split are two more Philodendrons with attractive “split leaves.”

The advent of the internet and social media has made instant celebrities of some plants. Take the example of a plant like Philodendron Monstera. There has been debate and speculation on why the plant naturally has holes in its foliage like the holes in a slice of swiss cheese. Some have suggested that Monsteras native to tropical regions evolve and develop holes in their leaves to resist the strong winds of hurricanes. Plants like Strelitzia better known as Bird of Paradise split their leaves to allow wind through as well. Others have suggested the Philodendron as it gains height has the holes to better allow water to come in contact with their roots. 

You might say the “hole theories” have holes in them. Wouldn’t it be true then that all hurricane region tropicals would adapt and have holes in them? If the rainwater theory held water wouldn’t more plants do that? And if the plant is native to tropical rainforests where it rains a lot would it really be necessary to be holey? There must be a better explanation for the “do what you need to do” adaptation with these plants. A better explanation than healthy plants “shot” full of holes look interesting and make for a great social media post.  

The slits or holes in the leaves is called fenestration. It may be the Philodendron monstera as an understory plant has adapted to maximize available light. 

Monsteras vine up trees growing from the forest floor in an epiphytic way. Light can be at a premium with the plant trying to capture sunlight that makes it through the forest canopy. 

A whole leaf and a fenestrated leaf can individually perform the same but the “holey” leaf is able to share light with those below. The unique leaf structure and plant makes a sacrifice for the good of all, namely light for those below to survive. They understand that they and the understory plants are in this together. 

Many Philodendrons are notorious for their split personalities!

3. Leaf Variegation

There is high demand for houseplants that have variegated leaves. Splashes of variegation on foliage like a Ficus Tineke or Ruby can add color, variety and interest to your houseplant collection!

Leaf variegation is in high demand!
Scindapsus

4. Silver and Blue Hues
Blue-hued plants such as Cebu Blue Pothos have become very collectible. Plants like Moonshine offer interesting foliage. Look for continued increase in varieties with blue or silver hues for our houseplant collections.

Silver Sword Philodendron

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Houseplant trends

1. Big Bold LeavesHere at Flowerland we find that plants that feature large, wide, and dramatic leaves are popular. “Big-leafed” plants, such as Monstera, Fiddle